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ALPS Social, Emotional and Academic Growth


Multi-tiered systems of support

tree with fruit and roots

The Student Success Team (SST) is an early intervention process that brings together the student, parent/guardian, teachers and administrators to identify student needs and develop an improvement plan to address those needs. School staff can request an SST meeting for individual students.  If parents feel that an SST is needed, they can contact their school ALPS Lead, who will request an SST meeting.   The outcome of the SST meeting provides school staff with recommendations and strategies to support and challenge the students in the local school.   

Scheduling an SST

  1. Parents should let the teacher or ALPS Lead know if they would like to schedule an SST.
  2. The teacher or ALPS Lead can notify the ALPS Office and relay the student needs, parent concerns, and teacher perspective.
  3. Once the ALPS Coordinator has this information, an SST will be scheduled.

ALPS Planning Guide for SST Conferences

Grades K-3

  • The summer of 3rd grade, students can sign up to attend ALPS Summer Academies.

Grades 4-5

  • Differentiated, rigorous and accelerated experiences during the school day, which can include the ALPS Project Zone, online math programs, or other off-line options.
  • The summer of grades 4-5, students can sign up to attend ALPS Summer Academies.

Grades 6-8

  • Currently, middle schools use accelerated classes and/or cluster-grouping within a mixed ability classroom to address the needs of advanced learners.
  • All grades 6, 7, and 8 participate in project-based learning (PBL), which provides depth and complexity. Instead of going faster through concepts, students go deeper into their learning. All middle schools use the cluster-grouping model to enhance the depth of learning that PBL provides.
  • A 6-week after-school Mathletes class that culminates in a district-wide competition each spring.
  • Differentiated, rigorous and accelerated experiences during the school day, which can include the ALPS Project Zone, online math programs, or other off-line options.

High School

  • Honors Courses provide more academic rigor and therefore demonstrate to colleges a student’s willingness to take on challenge, and will prepare them for the courses they will encounter at college.  In addition, doing well in an honors course demonstrates how a student will do in a college level course. Students should select honors courses if they want to increase the academic rigor of their high school program, if they hope to ramp up their college applications, or if they need to increase their GPA.
  • Advanced Placement (AP) Courses  also provide more academic rigor and can demonstrate a student’s ability to handle college-level courses and his or her willingness to take on challenge. But AP courses go further than that. These courses are designed to prepare students for the AP exams. These tests can be taken after completion of the AP course. Earning a 3 or higher on the exam will demonstrate competence in the subject and will earn college credit at some colleges.

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